IFR flight Phraseology Example[PDF]

Information

In this document, we use the following convention:

  • IFR Pilot call sign is SAU1234.
  • This is a flight from Paris Charles de Gaulle (LFPG) to London Heathrow (EGLL).
  • The sign Icon VFR.png/Icon IFR.png before the text means: this is the aircraft pilot transmission. (Icon VFR.png for VFR, Icon IFR.png for IFR)
  • The sign Icon heli.png before the text means: this is the helicopter pilot transmission.
  • The sign Icon follow-me.png before the text means: this is the follow me car transmission.
  • The sign Icon ATC.png before the text means: this is the air traffic controller unit (ATC unit) transmission.


The ATC is the one that may start using the short call sign. Only thereafter the pilot shall use it as well.

IFR Departure

Departure information


Where no ATIS is provided, the pilot may ask for current aerodrome information before requesting start up (of course if there is an active ATC nearby your position).

Icon IFR.png De Gaulle delivery hello, SAU1234, request departure information

Icon ATC.png SAU1234, departure runway 26R, wind 290 degrees 6knots, QNH1000, temperature 14, dew point 3, visibility 8000m, clouds broken 030.

IFR departure clearance

The aircraft shall read (or listen to) the complete ATIS before contacting the ATC. By saying the information letter, ATC will understand that the pilot has taken the ATIS information on board.

Icon IFR.png De Gaulle delivery, SAU1234, stand B9, request start-up, information BRAVO
Icon ATC.png SAU1234, cleared to London Heathrow via OPALE2B departure, runway 26R, climb flight level 100, squawk 5256.
Icon IFR.png Cleared to London Heathrow via OPALE 2B departure, runway 26R, climb flight level 100, squawk 5256, SAU1234
Icon ATC.png SAU1234, Correct, contact apron 121,650 when ready for push back

Icon IFR.png When ready for push back, contact apron 121,650, SAU1234

If the pilot does not read back correctly, ATC shall correct the wrong parameter using the “Negative” word:

Icon IFR.png Cleared to London Heathrow via OPALE 2B departure, runway 26R, climb flight level 120, squawk 5652, SAU1234
Icon ATC.png SAU1234, Negative, climb flight level 100, squawk 5256

Icon IFR.png Flight level 100, squawk 5256, SAU1234

If the start-up is delayed by ATC, ATC must give the minutes or event including reasons why the departure is delayed with the clearance:

Icon IFR.png De Gaulle apron, SAU1234, stand B9, request start-up, information BRAVO
Icon ATC.png SAU1234, cleared to London Heathrow via OPALE2B departure, runway 26R, climb flight level 100, squawk 5256, expect departure not before 35 due to 8 aircraft waiting at the holding point
Icon IFR.png Cleared to London Heathrow via OPALE 2B departure, runway 26R, climb flight level 100, squawk 5256, expect departure not before 35, SAU1234

Here, the start-up is delayed, ATC does not know the expected time for departure. ATC will delay the clearance:

Icon IFR.png De Gaulle apron, SAU1234, stand B9, request start-up, information BRAVO
Icon ATC.png SAU1234, expect start-up after 35 due to traffic on taxiway Alpha immobilized.
Icon IFR.png Roger, SAU1234

Push back operation

Icon IFR.png De Gaulle apron, SAU1234, Stand B9, request pushback.
Icon ATC.png SAU1234, pushback approved
Icon IFR.png Push back approved, SAU1234

If the pushback is not free or will not be free due to traffic taxiing, the ATC can delay the pushback:

Icon IFR.png De Gaulle apron, SAU1234, Stand B9, request pushback.
Icon ATC.png SAU1234, stand by, expect 2 minutes delay due B747 taxiing behind
Icon IFR.png Stand by, SAU1234
(after a while)
Icon ATC.png SAU1234, pushback approved
Icon IFR.png Push back approved, SAU1234

Taxi Clearances

Icon IFR.png De Gaulle apron, SAU1234, request taxi
Icon ATC.png SAU1234, taxi to holding point runway 26R, via taxiway Golf, Foxtrot and Romeo.
Icon IFR.png Taxi to holding point runway 26R, via taxiway Golf, Foxtrot and Romeo, SAU1234

As a pilot, you can ask another holding point or taxiway, the ATC can accept:

Icon IFR.png Request taxi via Echo, SAU1234
Icon ATC.png SAU1234, taxi to holding point runway 26R, via taxiway Echo

The ATC can refuse:

Icon ATC.png SAU1234, negative, continue taxi via Golf
Icon IFR.png Continue taxi via Golf, SAU1234

The ATC can propose an alternative solution:

Icon ATC.png SAU1234, negative, taxi to holding point runway 26R, via Echo and Golf
Icon IFR.png Continue taxi via Echo and Golf, SAU1234

In case of multiple ground frequencies, the ATC can clear the aircraft to an initial taxiway before contacting the next ATC :

Icon IFR.png De Gaulle apron, SAU1234, request taxi
Icon ATC.png SAU1234, taxi to G3, report approaching
Icon IFR.png Taxi to G3, report approaching, SAU1234
(after a while)
Icon IFR.png G3, request further taxi, SAU1234
Icon ATC.png SAU1234, contact De Gaulle Ground 126,780
Icon IFR.png Contact De Gaulle Ground 126,780 SAU1234
On 126,780 :
Icon IFR.png De Gaulle Ground, SAU1234, G3 request taxi
Icon ATC.png SAU1234, taxi to holding point runway 26R, via taxiway Golf, Foxtrot and Romeo
Icon IFR.png Taxi to holding point runway 26R, via taxiway Golf, Foxtrot and Romeo, SAU1234

Taxi to holding point, requiring a runway crossing:

Icon IFR.png SAU1234 approaching holding point, request cross runway 26L
Icon ATC.png SAU1234, maintain holding point runway 26L, traffic on short final
Icon IFR.png Maintain holding point, SAU1234
Icon ATC.png SAU1234, cross runway 26L, report vacated
Icon IFR.png Crossing runway 26L, SAU1234
(after a while)
Icon IFR.png Runway 26L vacated, SAU1234
Icon ATC.png SAU1234, roger, continue taxi via Delta

Sometimes taxis are faced with some traffic moving or waiting; the ATC can stop the traffic:

Icon ATC.png SAU1234, maintain position, give way to B747 passing left to right
Icon IFR.png Maintain position, B747 in sight SAU1234
(after a while)
Icon ATC.png SAU1234, continue taxi via Echo to holding point runway 26R.

Sometimes taxis are faced with some traffic moving or waiting; the ATC can let the aircraft organize its separation with the traffic:

Icon ATC.png SAU1234, give way to B747 passing left to right, taxi to holding point runway 26R
Icon IFR.png Give way to B747 in sight and taxi holding point runway 26R, SAU1234

At busy aerodromes with separate GROUND and TOWER functions, aircraft are usually transferred to the TOWER at, or when approaching, the runway-holding position.

Icon ATC.png SAU1234, Contact De Gaulle Tower, 118,650
Icon IFR.png Contact Tower 118,650 SAU1234

Conditional line-up clearance

If both ATC and Pilot have traffic in sight, conditional line-up clearances can be issued :

Icon ATC.png SAU1234, report AirFrance Airbus 340 short final 26R in sight.
Icon IFR.png AirFrance Airbus A340 in sight, SAU1234
Icon ATC.png SAU1234, behind the AirFrance Airbus 340 landing runway 26R, line-up runway 26R and wait, behind
Icon IFR.png Behind the landing AirFrance Airbus 340 landing 25R, line-up runway 26R and wait, behind, SAU1234

In case of poor visibility, as a result of which the pilot at the holding point cannot see the traffic, ATC shall not give any conditional clearance:

Icon ATC.png SAU1234, report AirFrance Airbus 340 short final 26R in sight.
Icon IFR.png No traffic in sight, SAU1234
Icon ATC.png SAU1234, maintain holding point runway 26R
Icon IFR.png Maintaining holding point runway 26R, SAU1234

Take-off procedure

Some aircraft may be required to carry out checks prior to departure and are not always ready for take-off when they reach the holding point:

Icon ATC.png SAU1234, report ready for departure
Icon IFR.png Wilco, SAU1234
(after a while)
Icon IFR.png Ready for departure, SAU1234
Icon ATC.png SAU1234, line-up runway 26R and wait.
Icon IFR.png Line-up runway 26R and wait, SAU1234

The take-off clearance shall be given to aircraft after lining-up, or at the holding point when necessary:

Icon IFR.png SAU1234, runway 26R cleared for take-off, wind 290 degrees 10 knots gust 25
Icon ATC.png Runway 26R cleared for take-off, SAU1234

When approaching a holding point, an aircraft can anticipate the call to the ATC in order to avoid a full stop at the holding point:

Icon IFR.png SAU1234 approaching holding point runway 26R
Icon ATC.png SAU1234, line-up runway 26R and wait
Icon IFR.png Line-up runway 26R and wait, SAU1234

A normal taking off clearance usually has two phases: lining-up and take-off.
As ATC, you can provide two separate clearances:

Icon ATC.png SAU1234, line up runway 26R and wait
Icon IFR.png Lining up runway 26R and wait, SAU1234
(after a while)
Icon ATC.png SAU1234, runway 26R cleared for take-off, wind 290 degrees 10 knots
Icon IFR.png Runway 26R cleared for take-off, SAU1234

Or, ATC can provide only one clearance with both instructions:

Icon ATC.png SAU1234, line up runway 26R, cleared for take-off, wind 290 degrees 10 knots
Icon IFR.png Line up runway 26R, cleared for take-off, SAU1234

In some particular procedures, the ATC unit may request the pilot to report when airborne:

Icon ATC.png SAU1234, runway 26R cleared for take-off, wind 290 degrees 10 knots, report airborne
Icon IFR.png Runway 26R, cleared for take-off, report airborne, SAU1234
(After take-off)
Icon IFR.png SAU1234, airborne

Special take-off operation

Departure instructions may be given with the take-off clearance. Such instructions are normally given to ensure separation between aircraft operating in the vicinity of the aerodrome.

Icon ATC.png SAU1234, climb straight ahead until 2000ft before turning right, runway 26R cleared for take- off, wind 290 degrees 10 knots
Icon IFR.png Climb straight ahead 2000ft before turning right, runway 26R cleared for take-off, SAU1234.

Due to unexpected traffic developments, it is occasionally necessary to cancel the take-off clearance or quickly free the runway for landing traffic.

Icon ATC.png SAU1234, hold position, cancel take-off, I say again, SAU1234, cancel take-off aircraft on the runway.
Icon IFR.png Holding position, SAU1234

Take-off cancellation when aircraft is rolling:

Icon ATC.png SAU1234, stop immediately, SAU1234, stop immediately.
Icon IFR.png Stopping, SAU1234

An aircraft on the runway and the runway needs to be evacuated immediately:

Icon ATC.png SAU1234, take-off immediately or vacate the runway.
Icon IFR.png Taking off, SAU1234

An aircraft on the holding point and the take-off shall be very quick in order to vacate the runway as soon as possible:

Icon ATC.png SAU1234, take-off immediately or hold short of runway
Icon IFR.png Holding short, SAU1234

The ATC can give the immediate take-off in a different manner:

Icon ATC.png SAU1234, B737 at 6NM final, are you ready for immediate departure ?
Icon IFR.png Ready for immediate departure, SAU1234
Icon ATC.png SAU1234, runway 26R, cleared for take-off immediately, wind 290 degrees 10 knots
Icon IFR.png Runway 26R, cleared for take-off immediately, SAU1234

An aircraft can abandon a take-off manoeuvre (for a technical problem for example) before the speed V1; the control tower should be informed as soon as possible:

Icon IFR.png SAU1234, stopping
Icon ATC.png SAU1234, roger.
(after a while, when aircraft speed is controlled)
Icon IFR.png SAU1234, request return to ramp
Icon ATC.png SAU1234, take next right, contact ground 121,780
Icon IFR.png Taking next right, contact ground 121,780 SAU1234

IFR Cruise

IFR initial climb

After take-off, an IFR flight shall be transferred to the next ATC:

Icon ATC.png SAU1234, contact De Gaulle Departure 131,200
Icon IFR.png Contact De Gaulle departure 131,200 SAU1234

During the first contact with the aircraft, the ATC shall identify the aircraft:

Icon IFR.png De Gaulle Departure, SAU1234
Icon ATC.png SAU1234, identified

Usually with the identification message, the ATC sends the departure procedure received and the initial level (which can be the first level given during the clearance or new expected level):

Icon IFR.png De Gaulle Departure, SAU1234
Icon ATC.png SAU1234, identified, climb via SID to FL140
Icon IFR.png Climb via SID to FL140, SAU1234

In addition to the ATC route clearance, a departing IFR flight may be given additional departure instructions in order to provide for separation.

Icon IFR.png De Gaulle Departure, SAU1234
Icon ATC.png SAU1234, identified, turn right heading 040 until passing FL070 then direct LGL VOR
Icon IFR.png Turn right heading 040 until passing FL070 then direct LGL VOR, SAU1234
Icon ATC.png SAU1234, report passing FL070
Icon IFR.png SAU1234, WILCO
(after a while)
Icon IFR.png SAU1234, passing FL070, (LGL VOR at 1456)
Icon ATC.png SAU1234, contact Paris control 128,100
Icon IFR.png Contact Paris control 128,100 SAU1234

Level instructions

Level instructions may be reported as altitude, height or flight levels according to the phase of flight and the altimeter setting.

Icon ATC.png SAU1234, report passing FL080
Icon IFR.png SAU1234, Wilco
(after a while)
Icon IFR.png SAU1234, passing FL080

Icon ATC.png SAU1234, climb to FL230
Icon IFR.png Climbing to FL230, SAU1234

Through the following clearance, ATC wants the pilot to reach the new level with the highest rate of climb until an intermediate level:

Icon ATC.png SAU1234, climb to FL240 expedite until passing FL180
Icon IFR.png Climbing to FL240 expediting until passing FL180, SAU1234

As a pilot if you are unable to follow the expedite clearance you shall report that to ATC:

Icon IFR.png Unable to expedite, SAU1234
Icon ATC.png SAU1234, Roger, continue climb FL330
Icon IFR.png Climbing to FL330, SAU1234

Clearance can be issued to maintain an altitude (often used at first contact) :

Icon ATC.png SAU1234, maintain FL330
Icon IFR.png Maintaining FL330, SAU1234

ATC may request the pilot to report when ready to begin his descent :

Icon ATC.png SAU1234, Report ready to descent
Icon IFR.png Roger, SAU1234
(When the pilot approaches the Top Of Descent)
Icon IFR.png SAU1234, Request descent
Icon ATC.png SAU1234, descend to FL110
Icon IFR.png Descending to FL110, SAU1234

Or the ATC can let the pilot manage his descent :

Icon ATC.png SAU1234, when ready descent to FL110
Icon IFR.png When ready descending to FL110, SAU1234

Once having been given an instruction to climb or descend, a further overriding instruction may be given to a pilot:

Icon ATC.png SAU1234, stop descent at FL150
Icon IFR.png Stopping descent at FL150, SAU1234

Level change using conditional clearance:

Icon ATC.png SAU1234, after passing NCS NDB, descend to FL070
Icon IFR.png After NCS NDB, descend to FL070, SAU1234

Occasionally, for traffic reasons, a higher than normal rate of descent (or climb) may be required in order to free flight level left.

Icon ATC.png SAU1234, maintain at least 1500 feet per minute to FL080
Icon IFR.png Maintaining at least 1500 feet per minute to FL080, SAU1234

The ATC unit shall transmit the QNH value or Altimeter setting value when it instructs an aircraft to descend and cross the transition level:

Icon ATC.png SAU1234, descend altitude 4000 feet, QNH 1023
Icon IFR.png Descending altitude 4000 feet, QNH 1023, SAU1234

Now an example with altimeter setting (inHg) used mainly in North America (FAA phraseology):

Icon ATC.png SAU1234, descend and maintain 4000, altimeter 2998
Icon IFR.png Descend and maintain 4000, altimeter 2998, SAU1234

ATS surveillance service

When an aircraft enters a controlled area, the ATC unit equipped with radar shall identify each aircraft:

Icon IFR.png Paris Control, SAU1234
Icon ATC.png SAU1234, identified.

When an aircraft leaves a controlled zone and no ATC unit is present in the next area, the ATC unit equipped with radar gives the following message:

Icon ATC.png SAU1234, radar control terminated.
Icon IFR.png Roger, SAU1234

In IVAO, you can include UNICOM in your message; the UNIversal COMmunications frequency for auto-information:

Icon ATC.png SAU1234, radar control terminated, monitor UNICOM 122.8
Icon IFR.png UNICOM 122.8, SAU1234

When an aircraft leaves a controlled zone and an ATC unit is present in the next area, the current controller must transfer the aircraft:

Icon ATC.png SAU1234, contact London Control 120,375
Icon IFR.png Contacting London Control on 120,375 SAU1234

ATC shall advice pilots if identification is established or lost:

Icon ATC.png SAU1234, identified 20 miles north west of Abbeville

Icon ATC.png SAU1234, identification lost due to radar failure, remain this frequency.
Icon IFR.png Roger, remain this frequency, SAU1234

Aircraft may be given specific vectors to fly in order to establish separation:

Icon ATC.png SAU1234, turn left heading 050 for separation.
Icon IFR.png Left heading 050, SAU1234

Icon ATC.png SAU1234, fly heading 050
Icon IFR.png Heading 050, SAU1234

Aircraft may be given instruction to maintain its present heading to maintain separation:

Icon ATC.png SAU1234, report heading
Icon IFR.png Heading 090, SAU1234
Icon ATC.png SAU1234, roger, continue heading 090
Icon IFR.png Continue heading 90, SAU1234

When vectoring is completed, pilots shall be instructed to resume their own navigation if necessary:

Icon ATC.png SAU1234, resume own navigation.
Icon IFR.png Wilco, SAU1234

The ATC unit shall give specific instructions in addition to the previous message:

Icon ATC.png SAU1234, resume own navigation direct SAU VOR.
Icon IFR.png Direct SAU VOR, SAU1234

Occasionally, an aircraft may be instructed to make a complete turn known as 360° turn (orbit for VFR) for delaying purposes:

Icon ATC.png SAU1234, make a three sixty turn left for sequencing.
Icon IFR.png Three sixty turn left, SAU1234

Traffic information and avoiding action

Whenever practicable, information regarding traffic on a conflicting path should be given in the following form:

Icon ATC.png SAU1234, unknown traffic, 1 o’clock 3 miles opposite direction fast moving
Icon IFR.png Negative contact, SAU1234
(after some time)
Icon IFR.png SAU1234, Traffic in sight

Example of traffic information with all details:

Icon ATC.png SAU1234, traffic 11 o’clock, 10 miles, southbound, Boeing 737, flight level 230.

When the ATC unit does not know some parameter, it can use the term like “unknown”, “unverified”. Example:

Icon ATC.png SAU1234, traffic 1 o’clock, 5 miles, from left to right, slow moving, type and altitude unknown

Radar instruction

Examples :

Icon ATC.png SAU1234, squawk 4112
Icon IFR.png Squawk 4112, SAU1234

Icon ATC.png SAU1234, check altimeter setting and confirm flight level
Icon IFR.png SAU1234, altimeter 1013, flight level 080

Manage aircraft with radio communication failure

There are several methods to identify an aircraft which faces a radio communication failure and is able to receive but not transmit messages. Identify with heading change:

Icon ATC.png SAU1234, reply not received if you read London Arrival, turn left heading 040
(the pilot turns to 040 degrees)
Icon ATC.png SAU1234, turn observed 5 miles south of WIK VOR, will continue radar control

Identify with squawk IDENT feature:

Icon ATC.png SAU1234, reply not received if you read London Arrival, squawk IDENT.
(the pilot presses on squawk IDENT button)
Icon ATC.png SAU1234, squawk observed 5 miles south of WIK VOR, will continue radar control

Alerting phraseologies

In the event that a minimum safe altitude is not respected by the pilot, the ATC unit will inform the pilot and issue appropriate instructions.

Icon ATC.png SAU1234, low altitude warning, check your altitude immediately, QNH is 1009, and minimum flight altitude is 6200 feet.

When the ATC unit considers that an imminent risk of collision will exist if action is not taken immediately, an avoiding action to be taken by the pilot is given.

Icon ATC.png SAU1234, turn right immediately heading 110 to avoid traffic 11 o’clock 4 miles.
Icon IFR.png Right heading 110, SAU1234
(after a while)
Icon ATC.png SAU1234, clear of traffic, resume own navigation
Icon IFR.png Roger, SAU1234

IFR Arrival

IFR Initial Approach

The approach controller will normally advise, on initial contact, the type of approach to be expected:

Icon IFR.png London Arrival, SAU1234, FL080, information Delta.
Icon ATC.png SAU1234, descend altitude 4000 feet QNH 1004, transition level 050, expect ILS approach runway 27L
Icon IFR.png Descending altitude 4000 feet QNH 1004, transition level 050, expecting ILS approach runway 27L, SAU1234

During the first contact, a pilot can include the arrival procedure cleared or performed in the message to the ATC unit.

Icon IFR.png London Arrival, SAU1234, FL120, BIG3B arrival, information Delta.
Icon ATC.png SAU1234, descend via STAR to FL70, expect ILS approach runway 27L
Icon IFR.png Descending via STAR to FL70, expecting ILS approach runway 27L, SAU1234

When performing a complex STAR, the approach controller can give a direct to an intermediate fix or initial approach fix for regulation:

Icon ATC.png SAU1234, direct TIGER
Icon IFR.png Direct TIGER, SAU1234

Holding procedures

If the ATC unit wants to delay the aircraft approach, it must send to the pilot the new expected approach time (EAT). The aircraft will perform a holding pattern on a specific point in this situation:

Icon ATC.png SAU1234, revised approach time 48 (minute 48 of the current hour)
Icon IFR.png Revised approach time 48, SAU1234

Normally, a holding procedure should be published. The ATC unit gives only the fix or navigation aid to hold at and the pilot-in-command will follow the holding pattern description published on charts (IAC and/or ARR charts):

Icon ATC.png SAU1234, hold over BIG hold as published
Icon IFR.png Holding over BIG as published, SAU1234

If the ATC unit wants to give a non-published holding procedure, it must describe its components to the pilot:

Icon ATC.png SAU1234, hold on the 265 radial of BIG VOR between 25 miles and 30 miles DME, FL100, inbound track 085, right hand pattern, expected approach time 1545
Icon IFR.png Holding on the 265 radial of BIG VOR between 25 miles and 30 miles DME, FL100, inbound track 085, right hand pattern, expected approach time 1545, SAU1234

The ATC unit can give a holding procedure, but an aircraft can ask for a holding procedure in order to descend if the pilot-in-command knows that the aircraft has too high altitude for beginning an approach procedure or if the pilot-in-command needs time to prepare his aircraft for final approach:

Icon IFR.png SAU1234, request holding procedure
Icon ATC.png SAU1234, hold at TIGER, FL070
Icon IFR.png hold at TIGER, FL070, SAU1234

However, when the pilot requires a detailed description of the holding procedure based on a facility, the following phraseology should be used:

Icon ATC.png SAU1234, hold at DET
Icon IFR.png Request holding instructions, SAU1234
Icon ATC.png SAU1234, hold at DET VOR, inbound track 250 degrees, left hand pattern, outbound time 1 minute.
Icon IFR.png Holding at NCR NDB, inbound track 250 degrees, left hand, outbound 1 minute, SAU1234

IFR final approach

Then, after this first contact, the ATC unit will give the descent instruction to the aircraft in order to reach the final approach altitude and can also give the approach clearance in a different or in the same communication:

Icon ATC.png SAU1234, descent 2000ft, cleared ILS approach runway 27L, report ILS established
Icon IFR.png Descending 2000 feet, cleared ILS approach runway 27L, Wilco, SAU1234
(after a while)
Icon IFR.png SAU1234, established ILS runway 27L
Icon ATC.png SAU1234, contact tower 118,500
Icon IFR.png 118,500 SAU1234

If an IFR aircraft wants a visual approach, ATC must check that the aircraft will maintain the visual reference to the terrain before giving the clearance:

Icon IFR.png SAU1234, 2000ft, runway in sight, request visual approach
Icon ATC.png SAU1234, cleared visual approach runway 27L
Icon IFR.png Cleared visual approach runway 27L, SAU1234

In order to speed up the arrival and approach procedure or to regulate traffic between arriving aircraft, vectors can be given by the ATC unit to arriving flights to position them onto a pilot-interpreted final approach aid, or to a point from which a visual approach can be made.

Example of vectors to final approach using ILS aid with restriction which can be used or not by ATC unit:

Icon IFR.png SAU1234, approaching TIGER, FL060
Icon ATC.png SAU1234, vectoring for ILS approach runway 27L, QNH 1008
Icon IFR.png ILS approach runway 27L, QNH 1008, SAU1234
Icon ATC.png SAU1234, leave Big Hill VOR heading 090
Icon IFR.png Leaving Big Hill VOR heading 090, SAU1234
Icon ATC.png SAU1234, report speed
Icon IFR.png SAU1234, speed 250 knots
Icon ATC.png SAU1234, for separation reduce minimum clean speed
Icon IFR.png Reducing speed 205 knots, SAU1234
Icon ATC.png SAU1234, descend altitude 2500 feet QNH 1008, transition level 050, number 4 for the approach
Icon IFR.png Leaving FL060, Descending altitude 2500 feet QNH 1008, transition level 050, SAU1234
Icon ATC.png SAU1234, Turn left heading 340
Icon IFR.png Left heading 340, SAU1234
Icon ATC.png SAU1234, 12 miles from touchdown, reduce to minimum approach speed, turn left heading 300, cleared ILS approach runway 27L, report established
Icon IFR.png Reducing minimum approach speed, left heading 300, cleared ILS approach runway 27, report established, SAU1234
(after a while)
Icon IFR.png SAU1234, established ILS 27L
Icon ATC.png SAU1234, no ATC speed restriction, contact tower 188,500
Icon IFR.png Contacting tower 118,500 SAU1234

Final approach and landing

Icon IFR.png London Tower, SAU1234, final runway 27L
Icon ATC.png SAU1234, runway 27L, cleared to land, wind 250 degrees 22knots
Icon IFR.png Runway 27L, cleared to land, SAU1234

If the runway is not free, and the aircraft makes a position report on final, the ATC shall invite the pilot in command to continue his current approach:

Icon IFR.png SAU1234, long final runway 27L
Icon ATC.png SAU1234, continue approach runway 27L, wind 260 degrees 20knots.
Icon IFR.png SAU1234, continue approach runway 27L

For training purposes, a pilot may request permission to make an approach along, or parallel to the runway, without landing:

Icon IFR.png SAU1234, request low approach runway 27L for training.
Icon ATC.png SAU1234, cleared low approach runway 27L, not below 250feet.
Icon IFR.png SAU1234, cleared low approach runway 27L, not below 250 feet.

Go around procedure

ATC request a go around:

Icon ATC.png SAU1234, go around, wind 270 degrees 10 knots, aircraft on the runway.
Icon IFR.png Going around, SAU1234

Pilot initiates a go around:

Icon IFR.png Going around, SAU1234
Icon ATC.png SAU1234, Roger, wind 270 degrees 10 knots, contact London Arrival 131,625
Icon IFR.png Contacting London Arrival 131,625 SAU1234

After landing

Icon ATC.png SAU1234, Take first right, when vacated contact ground 121,625
Icon IFR.png Taking first right, and contact ground 121,625 SAU1234

After vacating, the pilot in command shall ask a taxi clearance to continue:

Icon IFR.png London Ground, SAU1234, runway vacated via Echo
Icon ATC.png SAU1234, Taxi to Stand 6D via taxiway Golf.
Icon IFR.png Stand 6D via taxiway Golf, SAU1234


See also

Reference

  • ICAO Documentation 4444 - Air Traffic Management - 16th Edition July 2016

Author

  • VID 450012 - Creation
  • VID 150259 - Update (Feb-2019)

DATE OF SUBMISSION

  • 16:37, 16 November 2019

COPYRIGHT

  • This documentation is copyrighted as part of the intellectual property of the International Virtual Aviation Organisation.

DISCLAIMER

  • The content of this documentation is intended for aviation simulation only and must not be used for real aviation operations.