ATIS[PDF]

Introduction

The meteorological information and operational information concerning radio navigation services and aerodromes included in the flight information service shall, whenever available, be provided in an operationally integrated form.

These forms can be :

  • HF operational flight information service (OFIS) broadcasts
  • VHF operational flight information service (OFIS) broadcasts
  • Voice-automatic terminal information service (Voice-ATIS) broadcasts
  • Data link-automatic terminal information service (D-ATIS)

Automatic Terminal Information Service, or ATIS, is a continuous broadcast of recorded aeronautical information in busier airports for Voice-ATIS

ATIS broadcasts contain essential information, such as weather information, active runways, available approaches, NOTAM, and any other information required by the pilots.

Pilots listen to ATIS broadcast information before contacting the local air traffic controller, in order to reduce the controllers' workload and to prepare their flight.

Voice-ATIS

Voice-automatic terminal information service (Voice-ATIS) broadcasts shall be provided at aerodromes where

there is a requirement to reduce the communication load on the ATS VHF air-ground communication channels. When provided, they shall comprise:

  • one broadcast serving arriving aircraft; or
  • one broadcast serving departing aircraft; or
  • one broadcast serving both arriving and departing aircraft; or
  • two broadcasts serving arriving and departing aircraft respectively at those aerodromes where the length of a broadcast serving both arriving and departing aircraft would be excessively long.

Whenever Voice-ATIS is provided, the broadcast shall be continuous and repetitive.

A discrete VHF frequency shall, whenever practicable, be used for Voice-ATIS broadcasts. If a discrete frequency is not available, the transmission may be made on the voice channel(s) of the most appropriate terminal navigation aid(s), preferably a VOR, provided the range and readability are adequate.

The information contained in the current broadcast shall immediately be made known by the pilot to the ATC controller concerned with the provision to aircraft of information relating to approach, landing and takeoff.

Voice-ATIS broadcasts provided at designated aerodromes for use by international air services shall be available in the English language as a minimum.

Datalink-ATIS

Where a D-ATIS supplements the existing availability of Voice-ATIS, the information shall be identical in both content and format to the applicable Voice-ATIS broadcast.

Where a D-ATIS supplements the existing availability of Voice-ATIS and the ATIS requires updating, Voice–ATIS and D-ATIS shall be updated simultaneously.

D-ATIS and Voice-ATIS rules

Whenever Voice-ATIS and/or D-ATIS is provided:

  • the information communicated shall relate to a single aerodrome
  • the information communicated shall be updated immediately a significant change occurs
  • the preparation and dissemination of the ATIS message shall be the responsibility of the air traffic services (Tower controller in real life and each controller in IVAO capable of providing ATIS)
  • individual ATIS messages shall be identified by a designator in the form of a letter of the ICAO spelling alphabet. Designators assigned to consecutive ATIS messages shall be in alphabetical order
  • aircraft shall acknowledge receipt of the information upon establishing communication with the Air traffic controller providing approach control service or the aerodrome control tower, as appropriate
  • the appropriate Air Traffic Controller shall, in the case of arriving aircraft, provide the aircraft with the current altimeter setting; and
  • the meteorological information shall be extracted from the local meteorological routine or special report (METAR)


When rapidly changing meteorological conditions make it inadvisable to include a weather report in the ATIS, the ATIS messages shall indicate that the relevant weather information will be given on initial contact with the appropriate ATS unit.

If an aircraft acknowledges receipt of an ATIS that is no longer current, any element of information that needs updating shall be transmitted to the aircraft without delay.
The ATIS change is followed by advancing the alphabetic letter designation. The letter progresses down the alphabet with every update and starts at Alpha after a break in service of 12 hours or more.

ATIS content for arriving and departing aircraft

ATIS messages containing both arrival and departure information shall contain the following elements of information in the order listed:

  • name of aerodrome
  • arrival and/or departure indicator
  • contract type, if communication is via D-ATIS
  • designator
  • time of observation, if appropriate
  • type of approach to be expected
  • the runways in use
  • significant runway surface conditions and, if appropriate, braking action
  • holding delay, if appropriate
  • transition level, if applicable
  • surface wind direction and speed, including significant variations
  • visibility and, when applicable RVR
  • present weather
  • cloud below 1 500 m (5 000 ft) or below the highest minimum sector altitude, whichever is greater;
  • air temperature
  • dew point temperature
  • altimeter setting(s)
  • any available information on significant meteorological phenomena
  • wind shear
  • information on recent weather of operational significance
  • trend forecast
  • specific ATIS instructions
  • other essential operational information

Example of ATIS in real aviation

The ATIS at an airport is usually given by an automated or recorded voice on a specific VHF frequency or via the vocal channel of a radio-navigation beacon.

Most airports in a certain country will often have the same ATIS format or layout with the same automated voice. In very complex airports, it is possible to have two ATIS frequencies, one for arrivals and one for departures.

ATIS transmissions can be received in a large zone (60NM maximum and 25000ft maximum) and ATIS is unique to each airfield.

This is an example of a real ATIS from Dulles airport.

Example:

DULLES INTERNATIONAL INFORMATION SIERRA.
1300 ZULU
WEATHER MEASURED CEILING THREE THOUSAND OVERCAST.
VISIBILITY THREE, SMOKE.
TEMPERATURE SIX EIGHT. DEWPOINT FOUR THREE.
WIND THREE FIVE ZERO AT EIGHT.
ALTIMETER TWO NINER NINER TWO.
ILS RUNWAY ONE RIGHT APPROACH IN USE.
LANDING RUNWAY ONE RIGHT AND LEFT, DEPARTURE RUNWAY THREE ZERO.
ARMEL VOR OUT OF SERVICE.

ADVISE YOU HAVE INFORMATION SIERRA.


Example of ATIS in IVAO

With the current network limitation, the IVAO network has adapted the ATIS information available for pilots:

  • There is no Voice-ATIS implemented. IVAO only provides via active air traffic controllers Datalink-ATIS
  • Each air traffic controller has his own ATIS even if they share several positions on the same airfield (DEL, GND, TWR, APP, DEP)
  • ATIS is written in text mode by air traffic controllers in a predefined form (Datalink-ATIS)
  • Pilots can only read ATIS information in text mode when tuning the ATC frequency or sending the appropriate command to the server with a specific command
  • ATIS contain the TeamSpeak server in the first line for voice communication process.

Like in real life, pilots shall indicate that he has "information" and the ATIS identification letter to let the controller know that the pilot is up to date with all current information.


ATIS of an area control centre

In real life, an Area Control Centre controller does not establish ATIS.
In IVAO, the Area Control Centre controller has a small ATIS in order to ensure the system works.

Area Control Centre ATIS in IVAO has:

  • Address of TeamSpeak server and channel name in the server
  • Literal name of ATC position
  • (optional) Regional transition altitude and flight level
  • (optional) Additional remarks

Example:

LFMM_S_CTR > EU9.TS.IVAO.AERO/LFMM_S_CTR

LFMM_S_CTR > MARSEILLE CONTROL

There is no letter designation for an Area Control Centre ATIS.

Elements extracted from this ATIS example:

  • IVAO voice server = EU9.TS.IVAO.AERO
  • Channel in the voice server = LFMM_S_CTR
  • Literal Name of ATC position = MARSEILLE CONTROLE

ATIS of approach, departure, tower, ground controllers

The controllers engaged to an airfield set their ATIS with the data provided for this specific airfield.

The ATIS linked to an airfield in IVAO has:

  • Address of the TeamSpeak server and Channel name in the server
  • Literal name of ATC position, the letter designator information and the ATIS creation time
  • Airfield METAR station or the closest METAR information if the airfield does not have a unique METAR
  • Landing (ARR RWY) and take-off (DEP RWY) runways
  • Transition altitude (TA) and level (TRL)
  • (Optional) Additional remarks
  • Confirmation message with the letter designator

Example:

LFMN_APP > EU1.TS.IVAO.AERO/LFMN_APP
LFMN_APP > NICE APPROACH INFORMATION HOTEL RECORDED AT 1618Z
LFMN_APP > LFMN 061600Z 24006KT 9999 FEW060 SCT100 12/06 Q1004 NOSIG
LFMN_APP > ARR RWY 04L / DEP RWY 04R / TRL FL60 / TA 5000FT
LFMN_APP > ILS 04L APPROACH IN USE

LFMN_APP > CONFIRM ATIS INFO HOTEL ON INITIAL CONTACT

Elements extracted from this typical ATIS example:

  • IVAO voice server = EU1.TS.IVAO.AERO
  • Channel in the voice server = LFMN_APP
  • Literal Name of ATC position = NICE APPROACH
  • Letter designator = HOTEL
  • Time of ATIS creation = 1618Z
  • METAR = LFMN 061600Z 24006KT 9999 FEW060 SCT100 12/06 Q1004 NOSIG
  • Landing runway = 04L
  • Take-off runway = 04R
  • Transition level = FL60
  • Transition altitude = 5000FT
  • Additional remarks = > ILS 04L APPROACH IN USE

See also

Reference

  • ICAO Documentation Annex 11 - Air Traffic Services - 14th Edition - July 2016 - Chapter 4.3

Author

  • VID 150259 - Creation & Wiki integration
  • VID 150259 - Update October 2019

DATE OF SUBMISSION

  • 15:53, 31 March 2020

COPYRIGHT

  • This documentation is copyrighted as part of the intellectual property of the International Virtual Aviation Organisation.

DISCLAIMER

  • The content of this documentation is intended for aviation simulation only and must not be used for real aviation operations.